Resume Tip Tuesday: 3 Tips for a Secret Job Hunt

Posted February 25, 2014

Welcome to Resume Tip Tuesday! Come to CareerBliss every Tuesday for a brand new resume tip to help you in your job search! Check out the archive for resume tips galore! 


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If you already have a job, it can be hard to take the plunge and start actively look for a new one. What if your boss stumbles upon your resume online? What if you’re pretty rusty when it comes to interviewing?

If you're serious about making a move, remember that job searching while you're employed puts you at an advantage. “Being currently employed can be appealing for potential employers, as they assume that the candidate's skill set is up-to-date,” says Leto Papadopoulos, director of training and development at King & Bishop. Don’t worry! There are some proactive measures you can take for a successful, secret job search.

1. Make an Appointment with an External Recruiter in Your Industry

“Get an appointment with an external recruiter and just talk to them (in confidence) to find out the relevancy of your current skill set, if you need to master a different craft, or gain additional certification to make yourself more attractive to the outside work force,” says Laura Rose, business and career management coach. It's a safer bet than sending resumes willy-nilly.

2. Depending On the Role, You Might Want to Consider Concealing Your Name

If you feel terribly uncomfortable putting your resume on job sites (just in case a colleague finds it), one option is to conceal your identity and mention that you’re searching confidentially in your cover letter.

Taylor Eide, Versique Search and Consulting, says this method is only great for folks who are looking to fill a very niche role.

“However, if the role is a more general role (i.e. HR Manager or Director) I wouldn't recommend them listing themselves as a confidential candidate because no recruiter is going to reach out to you if you don't have the basic information listed,” Eide says.

It’s risky because some managers may simply not have patience for that. On the other hand, managers like Barry Maher, who has consulted on hundreds of hires, says “I'm happy to look at resumes like that, knowing that if we select the applicant as a finalist for the job, the information will be revealed and references will be thoroughly checked,” he says.

3. Try to Include Info As Much as You Can

Keep in mind that the hiring manager love Googling candidates’ names. To compensate for this, it would be a good to consider including a link to a broader scope of your portfolio and resume online. If it's embedded in your resume, the chances of colleagues finding them is a little dimmer.

Barrett Kuethen, COO of Flazingo, suggests that you make sure you:

  • Include some form of legitimate contact info.
  • Describe your current company even if you don’t reveal their identity.
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The CareerBliss Team

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